News just in from our client, Pediatric Eye Associates about What is the Impact of Smartphones on the Eyes of Children

There is no avoiding technology today. Children are exposed to smartphones at a young age, even if they may not have one until their teenage years. If not cell phones, children are exposed to screens via television, computers, and portable DVD players. What is more, pediatric screen exposure has been increasing over time and this trend is predicted to continue.

As a parent, if you are concerned about the effect of excessive screen time upon your child’s vision, you may want to consult a pediatric eye doctor. Your doctor can also collaborate on how best to your child’s eyes both now and in the future.

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What is the Impact of Smartphones on the Eyes of Children

 

News just in from our client, Pediatric Eye Associates about What Should I Know About Amblyopia?

Are you concerned your child’s eyes are not developing as they should? Perhaps your son or daughter has complained of vision issues, or you have noticed their eyes are not in alignment. They may have a pediatric eye disorder called amblyopia, also known as “lazy eye.”

Without treatment, amblyopia can become a permanent condition. It is important to see a pediatric eye doctor for proper diagnoses and appropriate interventions. This article will discuss amblyopia and explain what you can expect if your child needs treatment for this common pediatric eye disorder.

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What Should I Know About Amblyopia?

 

Latest update from our client, Pediatric Eye Associates about What You Need To Know About Pediatric Eye Exams

The American Academy of Pediatrics suggests that your child has a well-child check at regular intervals. As part of this, and beginning at age three, pediatricians recommend a comprehensive eye exam at visits. It may even be recommended sooner if there are concerns with the development of your child’s eyes. The American Optometric Association goes even further – suggesting that  infants have their first eye exam between 6 months and one year, with their next screening at age 3. Then, once your child turns 5, your child should have an eye exam yearly.

Ok, so perhaps you already knew that your child needs an eye exam every year and you already understand the importance of screening for any changes in their vision. But have you ever wondered what else your pediatric eye doctor does during an eye exam? In this blog post, we aim to give you an overview of a number of pediatric eye disorders which they screen for during a check-up.

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What You Need To Know About Pediatric Eye Exams

 

News just in from our client, Pediatric Eye Associates about What Types of Pediatric Eye Disorders Are There?

Many parents are unaware that their children’s eyes are developing, thus are vulnerable to serious eye disorders. For this reason, pediatric ophthalmologists in NJ suggest regular eye exams for prevention and reliable diagnosis of eye disorders.

Diagnosing, intervening, and treating conditions can support the healthy development of your child’s eyesight. Further, it is also a good idea for parents to have a general awareness surrounding various eye conditions. Such awareness can help bring attention to concerns in-between vision exams and facilitate a trustworthy partnership between yourself and your child’s provider.

In this blog post, we aim to give an overview of some of the more common eye disorders. We start, below, with refractive errors.

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What Types of Pediatric Eye Disorders Are There?

 

News just in from our client, Pediatric Eye Associates about COVID-19 and pediatric conjunctivitis

Conjunctivitis, also known as pink eye, is the inflammation of the conjunctiva, the clear tissue covering the white part of the eyes. It becomes red or swollen when it is infected, irritated, or inflamed due to a bacteria or virus.

Pink eye has been detected as an uncommon symptom in a small number of children positive for COVID-19, according to The Lancet. In one case in China, a 2-year-old boy developed conjunctivitis and eyelid dermatitis seven days after testing positive for the virus. Furthermore, a case study involving five children has revealed that conjunctivitis may be the only sign and symptom of an active COVID-19 infection in children and that they may not develop respiratory symptoms at all.

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COVID-19 and pediatric conjunctivitis

 

Check out our client, Pediatric Eye Associates about Should parents be worried about their premature baby’s eyes?

A premature baby is a baby born before the 37th week of gestational age. As a normal pregnancy lasts 40 weeks, premature babies, or preemies, have less time to develop in the womb.  This makes them more likely to have health complications or birth defects.

The US National Institute of Health acknowledges that children born preterm are at greater risk of ophthalmic conditions, including strabismus or retinopathy of prematurity (ROP) than children born at term. The experts note that premature birth is responsible for 35 percent of vision impairment cases as the final stages of vision development occur in the last few weeks of pregnancy. Accordingly, the risk of ocular abnormalities becomes one of the greatest fears for parents, as well as the physicians who care for preterm infants.

To prevent vision problems or its loss you should be aware of the risk and what you can do about it. Experts at Pediatric Eyes Associates assure you that routine ophthalmologic assessments in the early years can allow for appropriate and timely interventions.

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Should parents be worried about their premature baby’s eyes?

 

Latest update from our client, Pediatric Eye Associates about Children’s eye therapy - a chance to let them see their future clearly!

A number of conditions affecting eyesight have their source in early childhood, or they are congenital, meaning that a child is born with an eye disorder.

As children are more likely than adults to suffer from eye defects, taking them to a pediatric eye doctor regularly means that your child will get the medical care needed to treat any abnormalities in vision. Prompt medical care can guarantee more effective treatment, not only of minor but also of more complex sight problems, even if they require surgical procedures. Fortunately, many eye defects are minor and easy to treat if noticed soon enough. 

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Children’s eye therapy – a chance to let them see their future clearly!

 

Check out our client, Pediatric Eye Associates latest blog post about What’s to know about Strabismus?

Strabismus, or squint, is one of the most common conditions in ophthalmology. Eye doctors are called upon to correct misalignments where one of the eyes has turned upward, downward, outward, or inward. This latter inward deviation accounts for 75% of total cases in the US, which is why strabismus is sometimes called “crossed-eyes”.

There may be different causes of strabismus. Sometimes the muscles in the eyes (6 in each) fail to work together, or there may be a disorder in the brain that prevents coordinated movement in the eyes. Whatever the root cause, both eyes are simply not lining up to focus on the same spot at the same time.

What makes it so challenging for a contemporary child eye doctor is the staggering number of cases. Pediatric ophthalmologists estimate that strabismus affects up to 5 percent of the US population – 15 million patients – with almost 127,000 new cases occurring every year.

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What’s to know about Strabismus?

 

Check out our client, Pediatric Eye Associates latest update about What to look for when buying glasses for your child

When it comes to children’s eyeglasses, there are myriad styles to choose from, yet several other important factors must be taken into consideration before finalizing a purchase. The variety of styles, colors, and shapes available can be overwhelming but not all of them will be a suitable match for your child.

The challenge is in finding a pair that the child likes and will be willing to wear, while you are being confident that it won’t wear out or break easily and, if it does, the warranty covers the costs of getting the pair fixed.

Fear not! We are here to make your life easier by telling you what to look for when choosing eyewear for your child.

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What to look for when buying glasses for your child

 

News just in from our client, Pediatric Eye Associates about How to tell if your child needs to see an ophthalmologist?

Eye care should be an important part of your child’s overall health care regime. Eye exams are an important way to identify potential issues with your child’s vision before they become a problem. Early diagnosis and relevant treatment greatly increase the chances of successful outcomes. For a comprehensive eye test take your child to an ophthalmologist.

Who are pediatric ophthalmologists?

Pediatric ophthalmologists (MD) are medical doctors and surgeons. They are trained to diagnose, treat, and manage all children’s eye problems, as well as prescribe eyeglasses or contact lenses.

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How to tell if your child needs to see an ophthalmologist?