Latest update from our client, Pediatric Eye Associates about What You Need To Know About Pediatric Eye Exams

The American Academy of Pediatrics suggests that your child has a well-child check at regular intervals. As part of this, and beginning at age three, pediatricians recommend a comprehensive eye exam at visits. It may even be recommended sooner if there are concerns with the development of your child’s eyes. The American Optometric Association goes even further – suggesting that  infants have their first eye exam between 6 months and one year, with their next screening at age 3. Then, once your child turns 5, your child should have an eye exam yearly.

Ok, so perhaps you already knew that your child needs an eye exam every year and you already understand the importance of screening for any changes in their vision. But have you ever wondered what else your pediatric eye doctor does during an eye exam? In this blog post, we aim to give you an overview of a number of pediatric eye disorders which they screen for during a check-up.

Click the link below to find out more:

What You Need To Know About Pediatric Eye Exams

 

News just in from our client, Pediatric Eye Associates about COVID-19 and pediatric conjunctivitis

Conjunctivitis, also known as pink eye, is the inflammation of the conjunctiva, the clear tissue covering the white part of the eyes. It becomes red or swollen when it is infected, irritated, or inflamed due to a bacteria or virus.

Pink eye has been detected as an uncommon symptom in a small number of children positive for COVID-19, according to The Lancet. In one case in China, a 2-year-old boy developed conjunctivitis and eyelid dermatitis seven days after testing positive for the virus. Furthermore, a case study involving five children has revealed that conjunctivitis may be the only sign and symptom of an active COVID-19 infection in children and that they may not develop respiratory symptoms at all.

Click the link below to find out more:

COVID-19 and pediatric conjunctivitis

 

News just in from our client, Pediatric Eye Associates about How to tell if your child needs to see an ophthalmologist?

Eye care should be an important part of your child’s overall health care regime. Eye exams are an important way to identify potential issues with your child’s vision before they become a problem. Early diagnosis and relevant treatment greatly increase the chances of successful outcomes. For a comprehensive eye test take your child to an ophthalmologist.

Who are pediatric ophthalmologists?

Pediatric ophthalmologists (MD) are medical doctors and surgeons. They are trained to diagnose, treat, and manage all children’s eye problems, as well as prescribe eyeglasses or contact lenses.

Would you like to find out more? Click the link below:

How to tell if your child needs to see an ophthalmologist?

 

News just in from our client, Pediatric Eye Associates about Eye Problems to Look out for in Summer: Part 2

The end of the summer holidays is here. And even though your little ones didn’t get sick, or injured during the school break, it doesn’t mean that they are not going to show any symptoms soon. Many conditions take time to develop, with symptoms being easily missable, such as light sensitivity, or redness. However, it’s nothing to worry about – our expert pediatric eye doctor has your back!

In our last article we warned parents to look out for dry eyeness and infection from lenses and water, whilst explaining what activities can cause these two conditions. In this article our ophthalmologist will discuss the other two categories of conditions commonly developed by children on during the summer break. Namely, infectious conjunctivitis and conditions caused by excessive UV exposure.

Click the link below to find out more:

Eye Problems to Look out for in Summer: Part 2

 

News just in from our client, Pediatric Eye Associates about Refractive error explained:

Today’s life is incredibly straining for the eyes for our young ones. The prevalence of technology, environmental factors, genetics and unexpected events can affect children’s vision. Therefore, our pediatric eye doctor recommends that your children have their first ophthalmologist check up around the age of 3. In the case of eyesight and eye health, early detection is crucial! In our last article 5 common eye and vision problems experienced by children we went through the common eye problems that children experience. Refractive error is an important one.

WHO estimates that 153 million people worldwide live with visual impairment due to uncorrected refractive errors, without including uncorrected presbyopia “which is likely to be quite significant, according to some early evidence”.

But, what is a refractive error? There are many specific types of refractive errors that differ in their symptoms and treatments. So, we will breakdown the 4 most common types of refractive errors for you! But, first, let us explain what the umbrella term, refractive error, means.

Click the link below to find out more:

Latest update from our client, Pediatric Eye Associates about 5 common eye and vision problems experienced by children:

Oftentimes as parents we notice that there is something wrong with our child – it’s either their mood or something physical. And we do everything we can to find out what it is and take appropriate measures to make it better. At the same time, they are children, something is going on all the time and it is hard to take everything seriously at times. However, when it comes to your child’s eye health it is hugely important to take everything seriously. 

Many conditions are only curable when detected and treated at an early age. Your child should regularly visit a pediatric eye doctor from an age as early as 3 years old. However, if you have any suspicions, seek a pediatric ophthalmologist’s help immediately.

Click the link below to find out more:

Latest update from our client, Pediatric Eye Associates: 3 ways that poor vision can affect your child at school

Many children complain of being bored at school or not understanding the teacher, but what if the problem could be solved with glasses? One of the most common sources of problems for children in school is an inability to see the board, but not being able to see what’s written is not the only way having poor vision affects children’s ability to learn.

Here are three ways that poor vision can affect your child’s school success:

3 ways that poor vision can affect your child at school

 


latest update from our clients  pediatric eye doctor Pediatric Eye Associates  This article was written on behalf of the practice by RedCastle Services. RedCastle specializes in Online Marketing for Doctors, including Medical SEO, SEO for doctors, and Medical Website Design. Contact RedCastle Services today to find out how we can help your practice increase its number of online patient referrals.

Check out the latest post from Pediatric Eye Associates: Eye injury: Should you go to the ER or not

Sight is one of the essential senses, but new research says that you are probably going to the emergency room too often for vision problems. In the journal JAMA Ophthalmology, researchers from John Hopkins University find that nearly 50% of visits to the ER for eye problems were non-emergency situations that would have been better addressed at your local pediatric ophthalmologist or urgent care center.

Would you like to find out more? Click the link below:

https://kideyedoc.com/eye-injury-er-or-not/ 

 


latest update from our clients  pediatric eye doctor Pediatric Eye Associates  This article was written on behalf of the practice by RedCastle Services. RedCastle specializes in Online Marketing for Doctors, including Medical SEO, SEO for doctors, and Medical Website Design. Contact RedCastle Services today to find out how we can help your practice increase its number of online patient referrals.